This was the only ‘Derp’ we managed to visit on what was my first ever ‘derp-roadtrip’. After setting off early from our hotel in Prague, there was a long drive ahead of us to get to this place, which was a good three hours from our base in the capital.

It was a rather interesting drive too, past many villages, which for some reason all appeared to be abandoned, not a soul to be seen, for some reason I was imagining it was something straight from the Bram Stalker Dracula book, where people are only seen during the hours of darkness.

The other interesting thing about all these little villages was that ever one on them, no matter how small had a grand looking church as the village centre point, obviously religion formed a very large part of these people’s lives.

When we were about an hour or so from our destination, a small car accident happened, whilst going around a tight bend, the car had a disagreement with a large (a good foot tall) kerb, which resulted in a tyre which ended up being BER. The issue with this was that we had to empty the contents of the boot (luggage for 4 people) out onto the side of the road to get to the spare. We ended up having two spotters watching the traffic for any dangers as trucks thundered passed, whilst the designated mechanic quickly replaced the damage tyre.

With the damage repaired, we continued the drive and soon arrived at what was once probably a very impressive site.

There had been no recent images posted for a couple of years and it looks like time (and damage) has taken it’s toll on the place, as there was a lot more destruction than we had seen. There also appeared to be a lot more tagging on the walls as well.

Whilst we were wandering round, two locals turned up who didn’t speak a word of English, but they did not seem to want us to leave, more warning us that the roof in the main hall was in a dangerous state and we should be careful. After a few failed attempts at trying to communicate, the locals left and we continued our photo taking with no further issues.

Overall, I thouroughly enjoyed this place, it was set up as a place of rest and relaxation and I could still feel that atmosphere as we were wandering around and I can imagige many people had some memorable times here.

History

Jánské Koupele spa was founded around 1810 by Jan of Tenczina who left with the three ancient mineral springs and built the first spa house. Over the years it added more pavilions as baths were becoming increasingly popular. Their popularity has helped romantic location in the valley of the river Moravice surrounded by forests and clean air rich in ozone.

The greatest flowering of experienced spa in the early 20th century, when it was owned genus Razumovských. Count Camillo Razumovsky had to modify existing sources (Paul, John and Forest), he refurbished all the buildings and built a villa for families (Ruzena and Elisabeth). In 1897 he built a new source of the river Moravice and Marie grew up a new bath house (today’s pension Paul).

The park was covered colonnade and the 50th anniversary of the reign of Emperor Franz Joseph I. Razumovští established for poor people who needed spa treatment, a new villa Silesia. The facility was set up courts for cricket, tennis and swimming. In the vicinity of the spa were many promenades and walking sidewalks with benches and resting places.

The spa had around 120 rooms with about 200 beds and was used to treat disorders such as heart disease, neurasthenia, rheumatism, insomnia and metabolic disorders.

1940 was the last ever spa season. It then became part of the Sudeten Germans organisation and a training center for the Hitler Youth was set up during the war, along side a prison camp where they were holding seventy allied generals.

After 1945, the spa was under the Benes decrees nationalized and the area was children’s convalescent home and sanatorium ROH untill it’s closure in 1994.