This place appeared as a lead a few months prior to my visit, but for some reason, people didn’t seem to keen on visiting the place, I was undecided at first, but then saw a great report from CameraShy and it was decided that it was worth a visit.

IMG_32245So, with that in mind, we set our local Altrincham based Snout on the job of keeping an eye on where the demo team were up to and initially the feedback we received was good…apparently there was no sign of a demo crew and it looked like people were still working in there. This did not sound right to me, so with a bit of further clarification, we worked out that he had gone to the wrong location and was actually scouting an accountants office, so hopefully they were not too put off by the nose on the window.

With the correct site identified, we were then getting daily updates about things actually getting demolished, so we decided it was the upcoming weekend or nothing.

So, we arrived on site early one Sunday morning and found that the access point we were aware of had been well and truely sealed…with a couple of meaty looking padlocks, so it was backup plan…wander down the middle of the street then head under the temporary fence (glad this was pre-Christmas overindulgence).

My overall opinion of the site was that it was OK, but certainly not the best place I had ever visited, although it had been left for a few years, it was still too new looking and was not derpy enough for my tastes, however, it was better than staying in bed and missing out.
History

Altrincham’s hospital services began in 1853 when Lloyd’s Fever Hospital was built. By 1860 the hospital was making a vital contribution to improving access to health care for local residents. A Provident Dispensary was opened in 1861. Subscribers of a weekly sum could be treated at the hospital when necessary. The population of Altrincham was growing and in 1870, the management of Lloyds Fever Hospital and Provident Dispensary was handed over to the new Altrincham Provident Dispensary and Hospital, marking the establishment of what would become Altrincham General Hospital.

A new building to accommodate the growing population was proposed and a site on Market Street was chosen. Records show the building was occupied in March 1871, although no evidence of an official opening ceremony has been found. A man and his wife were also employed to reside in the hospital for the purpose of cleaning, attending to patients and assisting the resident IMG_32302dispenser.

The first matron for the hospital was a Mrs. Tatham, who was appointed in 1872 at the salary of £30 a year with board and lodgings. A report on the first year of service dated to 1872 reported that the number of in-patients admitted to the hospital was 28, of whom 17 were discharged as cured and four died. The average length of stay for patients was 36 days. Lloyds Fever Hospital closed in 1911.

The building was pulled down and the site turned into a children’s playground. As the threat of the First World War emerged the local Red Cross Society asked the hospital for permission to train volunteer nurses on its wards. It was agreed that two nurses would be trained at a time if they provided their own uniforms. On 10th August 1914, six days after the declaration of war the hospital sent a telegram to the War Office offering the use of a ward of 16 beds for wounded soldiers. By November the ward was in full use.

The hospital continued to provide healthcare after the outbreak of World War II with beds reserved for expected air-raid casualties.